Thursday, March 20, 2014

Recipe of the Week: Corned Beef Hash


Hash is a dish consisting of diced meat, potatoes, onions and spices that are mixed together and cooked.  The name is derived from the french verb hacher which means to chop.

Corned beef hash became popular in Great Britain and France during and after World War II as rationing limited the availability of fresh meats.  The addition of leftover vegetables including potatoes, cabbage, peas and brussels sprouts is called bubble and squeak.

My Pop cooked us up a big corned beef and cabbage feed for St. Patrick's Day on Monday and I kept the leftovers to make a hash this morning for breakfast.  It's day #1 of our annual March Madness basketball frenzy.

Enjoy!
Stacy


Corned Beef Hash with Poached Eggs

 

Ingredients:

1 1/4 lb Yukon gold potatoes, unpeeled, cut into 1/2 inch dice
2 Tbs butter
1 large sweet yellow onion, cut into 1/2 inch dice
1 red bell pepper, cut into 1/2 inch dice
1 1/2 lbs corned beef, cut into 1/2 inch dice
1/3 cup milk
1/2 cup flat leaf parsley, chopped
1 Tbs finely chopped fresh chives
salt and pepper
4 Tbs vegetable oil
4 eggs


Directions:

In a saucepan, combine the potatoes with lighly salted cold water to cover.  Bring to a boil over high heat, deduce the heat to medium and simmer, uncovered, until just tender enough to pierce with a fork, 5-7 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat a large non-stick pan over medium heat and melt butter.  Add the onion and bell pepper and saute until the onion is tender-crisp, 4-5 minutes.  Set aside.

Drain the potatoes and place in a bowl.  Add the onions and bell pepper, set the frying pan aside (do not clean it).  Add the corned beef, milk, 1/2 the chopped parsley and chives to the bowl.  Toss to mix well, taking care not to mash the potato pieces too much.  Season with salt and pepper.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in the frying pan over medium heat.  Add the hash mixture, pressing it down with the back of a spatula to form and even, compact cake.  Reduce the heat to medium low and cook, until crusty and lightly browned on the botton, about 15 minutes.

To serve: Garnish each hash cake with a poached egg and a few fresh parsley leaves.

Notes:  if you have leftover cabbage (like from a corned beef and cabbage feed, feel free to chop up the leftover cabbage and add to your hash)